Definition : Cadastre - Cadastral plan

Public document prepared by a land surveyor showing graphically on a plan a lot in relation with the other surrounding lots (common portion(s) and private portions). Filed at the Québec Land Register, its object is, without limitation to:

The cadastral plan is presumed to be accurate. A copy of this plan must be filed at the register of co-ownership and be kept at the disposal of any co-owner requesting it.

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  From the first day of existence of the co-ownership, that is to say when its declaration of co-ownership is published in the Land Register of Quebec, the co-owners as one body constitute a “syndicate of co-owners”. This legal person must ensure the "preservation of the immovable and manage the common portions." To form this co-ownership several steps involving many protagonists are necessary.
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 Most buyers attach great importance to an apartment area/price ratio. Therefore, before signing the deed of sale, take time to carefully measure the area of your unit. Discrepancies between what is shown on the plan provided at the signing of the preliminary contract, versus the actual area shown on the cadastral plan or the certificate of location are frequent. This difference can be explained by many factors listed in the factsheet entitled The Area of the Private Portion.
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The law provides that a syndicate must keep a register at the disposal of the co-owners. In most cases the declarations of co-ownership list the items it contains. This register is the memory of the syndicate, and consequently, its archives. In is thus invaluable. Much more than a mere witness of the sound management of an immovable, it is its prime instrument. Therefore, preservation and access are the hallmarks of this register.
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Parking spaces qualified as private portions are commonplace in divided co-ownership. This special legal status is attributed to them by the declaration of co-ownership, which designates them as fractions in the section devoted to the description of the fractions. Like an apartment held in co-ownership, all these spaces have a unique lot number, along with a relative value, and a share. Their owners may, at a general meeting of co-owners, prevail themselves of the votes attached thereto. These votes are added, as the case may be, to those they have for their apartment
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Section 1719 of the Civil code of Québec states that the seller must provide the buyer with a copy of the deed of purchase, as well as with a copy of the owner history and of the certificate of location he has on hand. Prepared by a land surveyor, the certificate of location is part of the property titles the seller must supply.  In the interest of the buyer, the certificate of location should clearly describe the current condition of all private portions (for instance, an apartment, a parking or storage space, or even land). Should the seller not have a certificate of location on hand (and unless the promise to purchase states otherwise), they will need to have one prepared, at their own expense. 
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The vendor has the obligation to reveal the exact superficial area of its private portion. The superficial area/price ratio is an important criteria for many buyers. It has a major influence on their decision to purchase Off plan sale The calculation of the superficial area of an apartment may lead to a conflict if,  in an off plan sale, the gross area shown on the architectural plan is the information used for the transaction. Thus, you should insist that the developer supplies a detailed plan of the apartment to be built, along with the method used to determine the superficial areas.
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