Definition : Destination - Destination of the private portions

The use that shall be given to each private portion under the provisions of the declaration of co-ownership (Constituting Act) and the purpose of which is which is   to provide the limitations to its  right of enjoyment. For example, if a private portion is intended for residential use, the co-owner may not use it for business. Furthermore, one should know that the amendment to the destination of a private portion may be authorized by the meeting of the co-owners with the consent of the co-owner affected under reserve that the amendment is not contrary to the destination of the immovable and that it does not infringe on the rights of the other co-owners.

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In principle, co-owners have the right to enjoy their private portion as they see fit. This use nevertheless has limits, namely that the right of enjoyment must not exceed normal neighborhood inconveniences. If the nuisance caused by an occupant of the immovable becomes excessive, it constitutes an abnormal neighborhood disturbance. This is the case in the event of non-compliance with clauses relating to the peaceful enjoyment of private portions, stipulated in the by-laws of the immovable. However, an abnormal neighborhood disturbance does not systematically constitute a violation of the declaration of co-ownership, as in some circumstances, this type of nuisance can be sanctioned, even if the perpetrator has not committed any fault.
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Any co-owner may have the relative value of their fraction, as well as the allocation of common expenses, revised according to certain conditions and formalities. To do so, it is necessary to proceed with an appeal to revise the relative value of the fractions. Furthermore, a co-owner may wish to modify the relative value of their fraction. Therefore, they will have to request the prior consent of the Board of directors or the general meeting of co-owners, depending on what is required. This revision or modification of the relative value has an impact on the proportionate share of the right of ownership (which the co-owners hold in the common portions), the number of votes they can cast at the meeting of co-owners and the allocation of common expenses. On this question, Article 1064 of the Civil Code of Québec stipulates that: “Each co-owner contributes to the common expenses in proportion to the relative value of his fraction.”
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The destination of the immovable, of the private portions and of the common portions is a fundamental concept in co-ownerships. The destination allows the determination the type of co-ownership established and defines the use(s) that can be made of the private and common portions. The destination of the immovable can be exclusively residential or commercial or residential but with the possibility of exercising professional activities. It can also be mixed, such as, allowing shops on the ground floor and apartments on the upper floors.
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The declaration of co-ownership includes the set of rules ensuring the efficient organization of a co-ownership. Its knowledge by the members of the board of directors and by each co-owner is essential to the proper operation of the co-ownership. This co-owners reference document is consulted, for example, in the case of work. For a promisor-buyer, the declaration of co-ownership contains a wealth of useful information regarding the conditions of use and enjoyment of the private and common portions. Hence the necessity of reading this document before buying, to avoid unpleasant surprises, especially as to the use one intends to make of his private portion.
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 The resolutions of the General Meeting of the co-owners require complex calculations in order to determine whether a the required majority has been reached. To do so, you must make sure that the register of co-owners is up to date, and that the compilation of votes is done according to the relative value specific to each fraction. This reduces the risk of contestation of an adopted resolution. That said, some decisions have extremely important consequences for all co-owners so the requirements in terms of majorities are then higher. For this reason, the law imposes three levels of majority: absolute, enhanced and double majority, depending on the importance of the decision to be taken.
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