Definition : Declaration of co-ownership - Description of the fractions

The third part of the declaration of co-ownership intended to enunciate the cadastral description of the common and private portions of a co-ownership and the description of the real rights attached to the immovable (for example, a servitude of right of way).

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  La déclaration de copropriété est le document maître d'un syndicat de copropriétaires. Elle définit les fondements mêmes d'une copropriété, et indique le code de vie à y adopter.
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  The declaration of co-ownership is a convention that organizes and regulates the collective life of the co-owners and occupants of the building. This Convention defines in particular their rights and obligations. It is usually developed unilaterally by the developer or owner of the building. Legally, the declaration of co-ownership is a real contract of adhesion, because any new co-owner is obliged to adhere to it. This is a key legal document. Its publication gives rise to the co-ownership and the syndicate. Look at the different aspects of the declaration of co-ownership.  
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The declaration of co-ownership includes the set of rules ensuring the efficient organization of a co-ownership. Its knowledge by the members of the board of directors and by each co-owner is essential to the proper operation of the co-ownership. This co-owners reference document is consulted, for example, in the case of work. For a promisor-buyer, the declaration of co-ownership contains a wealth of useful information regarding the conditions of use and enjoyment of the private and common portions. Hence the necessity of reading this document before buying, to avoid unpleasant surprises, especially as to the use one intends to make of his private portion.
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In divided co-ownership, the right of ownership is divided, among the co-owners, by "fractions", each comprising a materially divided private portion (e.g. an apartment, a parking or storage space, and sometimes even a plot of land) and a share  of the common portions. To each fraction is attached an undivided right of ownership in the common portions, and sometimes the right to use the common portions for restricted use. The fraction is the result of the division of a building to create a condominium. In other words, the addition of all the fractions constitutes, by the effect of the publication of a declaration of co-ownership, the condominium building.
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The characteristic of divided co-ownership is to divide the building into various lots that will be the exclusive property of the co-owners (private portions), and for others that will be the property of all the co-owners (common portions). These lots are identified by an individual number, which was assigned during the cadastral operation. Each of the private lots of the co-ownership thus constituted becomes a unique property. The distinction between the common and private portions is essential, particularly from the point of view of maintenance, which is the responsibility of the syndicate of co-owners for the common portions and of the co-owners for the private portions.   
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When you purchase an apartment in an immovable held in divided co-ownership, you become the owner of your dwelling (private portion), but also the owner of an undivided portion of the immovable designated as common portion (for example: the ground, balconies, major components such as foundations and main walls). This, taken as a whole, including the common and private portion, is designated in legalese as: a fraction. The fractions may contain one or more private portions. They are described in the declaration of co-ownership in the Section entitled the Description of the fractions, and they are physically identifiable. They may include an apartment, but also a parking space or a parcel of land (for example in townhouses or semi-detached homes).
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Question: In the declaration of co-ownership, there is a table determining the relative value of the apartment I plan to buy. And I am told that the allocation of common expenses is particularly in relation to this same "relative value". I wonder what exactly it is and whether it can be changed at the time of purchase?
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